All items: slavery

My starting point for the Jamestown book was a manuscript list of nearly sixty women sent over to Virginia, which I consulted one freezing December morning in the Pepys Library at Magdalene College, Cambridge.
My version of Animal Farm would look at how the slave revolt works itself out; it would explore ideas of light-skinned privilege, and look at the privilege literacy gives you.
It is sometimes hard to distinguish between memorable books and inspiring books. I remember books for various reasons, often to do with characterisation and dialogue.

Paula Byrne speaks with James McConnachie about the tragic fates of two lesser-known Kennedy siblings, doing meticulous scholarly research and yet publishing accessible books, moving into writing fiction, and investigating the psychological health benefits of reading with ReLit.

Mary Colson takes us to Olney in north Buckinghamshare, her childhood home and the site of an historic friendship between a poet and a slave trader.

Simon Rae takes us to Great Tew in north Oxfordshire, an estate village that began with lofty aspirations but descended to decrepitude.

Mary Colson speaks with John Siddique about the value of children’s non-fiction and the unusual constraints involved in writing it commercially, her love of writing for screen and stage, and the right way to teach writing and nurture children’s voices.

Jean Rhys’s 1966 novel, Wide Sargasso Sea, captivated Cherise Saywell when she first read it at the age of twenty, offering insights into the postcolonial world which reflected her own experience as a young Australian writer.
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