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10-12-2020

Jon Mayhew lauds Eastham Woods on the Wirral - a space of real and imaginary dangers where children could go properly feral.

Sue Roe does something she never expected to do - writing about her childhood home of Leicester.

'Choosing books indiscriminately by weight as much as content, I wanted to find books that were heavy enough to keep me going until my visit the following week and I didn't risk wasting my precious allocation of books on something slim.'
After an accident left him with a broken arm, Roy Bainton had to learn to manage without the use of one hand, discovering how difficult ordinary tasks, such as driving – and typing – had become. His experience left him chastened, and with a new insight into the lives of other writers whose disabilities were more permanent.
23-02-2017

Roopa Farooki explores what it’s like to be brown when all your childhood literary heroes are white, and explains why representation matters if we want to draw more children into reading.

Ray French considers his Irish roots and adopted British identity, and how, in writing about the Irish experience in Britain, he inhabits ‘that fascinating space between home and exile.’

12-01-2017

Joanna Nadin tells George Miller about growing up in Essex, her earlier career in politics, and writing about ‘extraordinary things happening to very ordinary people, in very ordinary places’.

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