All items: Sylvia Plath

When I first heard a poet read, in a chemistry laboratory at Newcastle University, he was Ted Hughes; his gruff Yorkshire voice threw me onto a frosty moor. I could see horses. Hear horizons.
Are writers mad — or only very sane? Horatio Clare reflects on this conundrum, with relation to his own experience of mental illness.

Robyn Marsack speaks with Cherise Saywell about how her interest in the literature of WW1 led her to the work of Edmund Blunden, about discovering her own grandfather’s WW1 writings, and an astonishing literary surprise.

Robyn Marsack speaks with Cherise Saywell about how she fell into translating the beloved French travel writer Nicolas Bouvier, and the differing challenges of translating prose and poetry.

Pippa Little speaks with Geoff Hattersley about poetry in her African and Scottish childhood, building a career as an early school leaver and her return to Higher Education, and her approaches to writing.

Diane (Middlebrook)'s study, which crucially extended the right to examine private life, was a turning point in late twentieth century biography.
As a writer of novels set in the past, Katharine McMahon has come to realise that the preoccupations she addresses in her fiction are also those of the present day, and that the distinction between ‘historical’ and ‘contemporary’ fiction may have outlived its usefulness.