All items: T.S. Eliot

When I first heard a poet read, in a chemistry laboratory at Newcastle University, he was Ted Hughes; his gruff Yorkshire voice threw me onto a frosty moor. I could see horses. Hear horizons.

Ann Morgan retells the grand old myth about becoming a published author, then takes her editorial red pen to all of its inaccuracies.

Nicholas Murray dissects his own reluctance to call himself a writer, after an early career in journalism and despite having subsequently published more than twenty books in a huge variety of genres.

Now I didn't need him to read to me anymore, that our sitting down side by side, and his joy in reading to me, was ended; guilt then, infests my reading habits from their beginning.
Miranda France describes the benefits of translation work for a writer: the chance to study the workings of a novel in detail, the wheels and cogs of composition, how characters drive the action, how the narrative is shaped, and then the awareness of the way different languages work
And do you think you don't need to learn how to dissect a frog because you have discovered T. S. Eliot? Why do you think that? It's nonsense.
The writer in me seemed to want to go one step further and turn this response into words, readable, informative, sometimes scholarly words; something that might last.
Reading habits become part of our legacy. A family that reads together passes down a wonderful inheritance; words enveloped in love, and thus given meaning.

Nicholas Murray and our host Julia Copus discuss two favourite classic poems, ‘To His Coy Mistress’ by Andrew Marvell and ‘The Sun Rising’ by John Donne, in another instalment of our special ‘Poetry Break’ series.