All items: Ted Hughes

As the child of bookshop owners, Simon Rae grew up knowing that running a bookshop might be his destiny. But the revelation that he would rather write books than sell them took him along a different path…
Before he could see, hear, or smell 'Fox', Hughes was aware of something entering the loneliness of his midnight writing moment. It is the second meaning of loneliness that needs to be embraced for such things to happen
When I first heard a poet read, in a chemistry laboratory at Newcastle University, he was Ted Hughes; his gruff Yorkshire voice threw me onto a frosty moor. I could see horses. Hear horizons.
Duncan Forbes describes the challenges and consolations of translating poetry and how it can help us to gain an insight into earlier times, distant cultures and other minds.
A change of place, finding a new muse, pausing on a London bridge, all can stimulate the writer's imagination again, says John Greening. From a sexual potency operation for W.B.Yeats, to Clive James’ terminal illness, there are many ways to trigger inspiration.
Diane (Middlebrook)'s study, which crucially extended the right to examine private life, was a turning point in late twentieth century biography.
As a young teenager in rural Ayrshire, Gerry Cambridge became interested in birdwatching — a fascination which has helped define his life, and a powerful influence on his poetry.
There are poets I love but will hesitate to read if I am in the middle of writing a poem because I know their style is infectious; Ted Hughes for instance, or Seamus Heaney. There's something Heaney-esque in every male poet of a certain age.