All items: Thomas Hardy

At school I used to swallow a book in the lunch hour, and now I can do two in that same time. It doesn't feel good. I race through them, unable to slow my reading speed down.

Ann Morgan retells the grand old myth about becoming a published author, then takes her editorial red pen to all of its inaccuracies.

Nicholas Murray dissects his own reluctance to call himself a writer, after an early career in journalism and despite having subsequently published more than twenty books in a huge variety of genres.

Now I didn't need him to read to me anymore, that our sitting down side by side, and his joy in reading to me, was ended; guilt then, infests my reading habits from their beginning.
There's a wayward part of me that resists plotting and wants to just plunge in. But if I yield to that temptation I risk the book being stillborn, so these days I tend to play safe.

Paula Byrne speaks with James McConnachie about the tragic fates of two lesser-known Kennedy siblings, doing meticulous scholarly research and yet publishing accessible books, moving into writing fiction, and investigating the psychological health benefits of reading with ReLit.

I read Macbeth first and happened to learn half of it by heart. This was Shakespeare's achievement not of my memory; after reading Shakespeare it's more difficult to forget him than to remember other poets.

Cynan Jones speaks with James McConnachie about 'the square mile' in Welsh culture, the experience of re-telling stories, and the spark that sends him to the writing shed to get a pending novel down on the page.

Julia Copus shares her diary in ‘My Writing Week’, encompassing a glitzy awards night in the city, the challenge of everyday administrative distractions back at home, and the role of dogs – the ‘heartbeat at my feet’ – in the lives of writers.