All items: USA

Katharine McMahon celebrates the role that public libraries have played in her life, from her earliest discovery of the magic of books as a child, to her later career as a writer.

Dipo Agboluaje speaks with Gabriel Gbadamosi about Britain and Nigeria, the big dreams of his characters and his knack of combining satire with character development, and the necessity for diverse playwrights to aim for the mainstream.

Rhiannon Tise’s fascination with abandoned buildings and derelict man-made spaces dates back to her early teens, and has inspired much of her writing. She reflects on the reasons why.
In writing about her past, Cynthia Rogerson found that employing the unvarnished truth rather than the embellishments of fiction was sometimes a more powerful way of describing uncomfortable events.
Although I had trained as a nurse, to me writing was a white, educated occupation; having read loads of books, it never dawned on me that people of colour wrote them.
In researching her biography of the artist Gwen John, Sue Roe sifted through hundreds of letters and notebooks, in archives held in Aberystwyth, Paris and New York. From these, she came to know a very different woman from the fragile recluse of popular myth.

Elanor Dymott speaks with Robin Blake about storytelling’s essential role in the British legal system, migrating from law journalism to fiction, and the childhood origins of an unsettling recurrent theme in her writing.

After many years of scriptwriting, Kevin Clarke gave it up for history studies. The Tudor and Stuart courts, their murderous rivalries, lies, thefts and ruthless betrayals, were familiar territory to anyone who has carved a career path through the British television drama departments.