All items: USA

After many years of scriptwriting, Kevin Clarke gave it up for history studies. The Tudor and Stuart courts, their murderous rivalries, lies, thefts and ruthless betrayals, were familiar territory to anyone who has carved a career path through the British television drama departments.
Leafing through those Nevada months I find a photo of a green pick-up truck and remember open roads, low slung hills, ghost towns, dust balls, camping in the woods, climbing ladders in the Mesa Verde National Park.

Nigel Cliff speaks with James McConnachie about the 19th century 'Shakespeare Riots' in New York, what might be driving his choice of subjects, and the differences between the US and UK publishing industries.

Charles Jennings mourns unused research from Utah: a concatenation of vice, gambling, Mormonism, hideous landscapes, a dead sea, padlocked beer — and the atomic bomb.

Nigel Cliff speaks with James McConnachie about cold war concert pianist Van Cliburn and Portuguese explorer Vasco da Gama, and considers their roles at turning points in history and meetings of cultures.

Chris Arthur speaks with Cherise Saywell about the essay as a multifaceted and ‘heretical’ form, the notion of a ‘dangerously failed’ piece of work, and the encouraging fact that ‘If you can find the objects that speak to you, essays will follow’.

Whenever I need to be reminded of why I love poetry, I turn to Jack Gilbert. He holds me back from the brink of dullness, from the pool of polite convention.
I am never without a book. It would be tortuous for me to be on a journey, short or long, without something to read. I have books in the bathroom, bedroom and the living room.