All items: USA

Puzzles, mirrors, infinite regressions, paradoxes; these perfectly crafted, erudite stories - despite their appeal to the intellect - grip like a vice.
Diane (Middlebrook)'s study, which crucially extended the right to examine private life, was a turning point in late twentieth century biography.
As writer in residence in a palliative care unit, Diana Hendry had to put into words the thoughts and feelings of the dying. Twenty years on, she reflects on what she learned from this experience, and wonders if attitudes to death have really changed all that much in the intervening time.

Donny O’Rourke speaks with Geoff Hattersley about American influences, anthologising a golden age of Scottish poetry, his love of travel, and how you distinguish a poem from a song.

Todd McEwen tells Frances Byrnes about how his early life in Southern California gave him abundance – in literature and landscape – but also taught him scepticism and helped him develop his distinctive writing voice.

Diana Evans takes us to a writer’s retreat in upstate New York, where she considers how race is a theme that seems imposed on black writers, obligating them to rage against racial injustice. Her characters, she says, have the right to be human first, 'to be ordinary.'

Cynan Jones considers place and authenticity in the storytelling process. 'Risk being unique or aim for palatable? That’s the choice, in writing as in wine-making.'

Cynthia Rogerson speaks with James McConnachie about ensuring realism in her novels, disliking positive discrimination, and putting up with having her serious novels packaged in chick-lit covers.

For many years, Sally Cline has lived a ‘secret life’, spending summers away from her Cambridge home in Austin, Texas. But are her two lives so very different after all?