All items: war

Eighty years after its publication, Ray French looks at how a famous novel and its film adaptation have overshadowed notions about Welshness, and how this might at last be changing.
When Sue Roe decided to write a group biography about the French Impressionists, she little realised what a challenge it would be, involving her in hundreds of hours of research and cross-checking of information about her ten famous subjects; she was inspired to visit the places where they lived and worked.
Over his long career as an art critic, Brian McAvera has compiled a collection of catalogues of Irish art exhibitions, offering a unique overview of twentieth and twenty-first century literary, artistic, and political life.
Selling books is as necessary as writing them but many writers, and I am one of them, have a love-hate relationship with the marketing of their books. This nearly always results from a mismatch.
Cal Smyth describes the true events that inspired his Balkan-set crime series, and celebrates some of the writers who pioneered the real-life crime genre.

James McConnachie looks back on the gender bifurcation of childhood reading - and reminds us not to underestimate the gender-transcending power of the empathetic imagination.

Mark McCrum leads us into the strange world of the ghost writer, whose perilous path encounters both too little and too much material, and where the famous subjects of ghost-written autobiographies can co-operate or not.

Rick Stroud speaks with Robin Blake about how his film-making background influences his literary projects, his fascination with WW2 and the projects it has led him to, and his love of simple, clear writing.

Her mother’s worsening dementia made Penny Hancock realise how important it is for people to feel at home — and why so many writers identify with a specific place.