All items: Wilfrid Owen

Robyn Marsack speaks with Cherise Saywell about how her interest in the literature of WW1 led her to the work of Edmund Blunden, about discovering her own grandfather’s WW1 writings, and an astonishing literary surprise.

Can coincidence, that seemingly magical conjunction of events, play a part in poetry? John Greening considers some famous and more personal examples of its power.

Nicholas Murray talks with George Miller about his book on the British poets of the first world war, and his own career as a poet, including his most recent collection of animal poems.

Dorothy Parker claimed the Bloomsbury set painted in circles, lived in squares and loved in triangles. Our own obsession with Bloomsbury, as Nicholas Murray points out, seems to spiral — in spite of their old school privilege and elitism. Does Bloomsbury merit our continuing regard? Or were they just a bunch of vocal, self-boosting toffs, whose artistry has been seriously overvalued?