All items: William Faulkner

Editing one’s own work can be a painful process, argues Nick Holdstock. Most writers are reluctant to ‘kill their darlings’, in Faulkner’s famous phrase. But if one can overcome this feeling, it can only make for a better work. At least that’s what he tells himself.
I learned about waypoints, sky countries, meteoro-glyphs, flying by instruments only, and whiteouts; it's not just a book about flying though, there's poetry here, and metaphysics.
As a dramatist, Fraser Grace has become used to working with other writers, in order to turn their original work into plays. Here he describes some of his more unusual – and rewarding – collaborations.

Jonny Wright considers the sobering parallels between the 1959 play A Raisin In The Sun, featuring a black family in Southside Chicago, and the racial inequality, downward economic mobility and defacto housing segregation of contemporary London.

Kerry Young describes her journey from failing 'O'-level English to becoming a successful novelist, and how her writing is a gift both to her late father and to the diverse cultures that have produced contemporary Jamaica.

Any writer who has ever been distracted by the ringing of the telephone, or the sound of an ice-cream van, will share Andrew Sant’s exasperation at the ‘ubiquity of noise pollution’ in the modern world. So how to cope with it, and get down to writing? He considers some options…

Livi Michael speaks with Frances Byrnes about the longstanding appeal of the epic, and of the writer’s need for courage.