All items: William Shakespeare

I feared these books would be dull, staid and part of the establishment that I was so busy rebelling against; and then I read Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte.
Katharine McMahon celebrates the role that public libraries have played in her life, from her earliest discovery of the magic of books as a child, to her later career as a writer.
As editor of The Author, James McConnachie has had to develop strategies for turning down the pitches of prospective contributors as politely – and firmly – as possible. Here he considers some of his preferred methods for saying ‘no’.
Quality TV drama writers inspire me to script scenes exactly as they happen in my head and to learn from the way people speak in real life... at the most dramatic moments of our lives, we rarely channel Shakespeare.
Clare Bayley reflects on the process of choosing names for characters and gives some famous examples, from Le Carré to Shakespeare, of writers who’ve answered the question: ‘What’s in a name?’ in an intriguing or provocative way.

Rukhsana Ahmad speaks with John Siddique about her peripatetic childhood in Pakistan, how her concern for other people motivates her to keep writing across years and genres, and how she’s avoided the constraints of the ‘post-colonial’.

Leigh Russell speaks with Robin Blake about becoming a crime writer in her fifties, writing series books that can also stand alone, what readers want from her genre and her surprising crime-writing hero.

Most of the Victorians I loved have lost their shine, too, for me, except George Eliot; her luminous sense of justice and vision distinguish her. However, recently Hilary Mantel has begun to supplant her.