All items: writing process

Plans so detailed as to be half a book in themselves. Finishing off each day with a paragraph in capitals of What I Am Going To Write Next. Rehearsing the next section in my head as I walk the dog.

Julian Turner speaks with Amanda Whittington about the ways in which his psychotherapeutic practice has influenced his writing, how metaphor and creativity are important in more than just literary practice, the role of religion and the human capability to transcend experiences of cruelty.

Most often I get stuck at the ends and beginnings and of chapters. I can't start the next chapter until the end of the last one is right. I know this usually means that whatever I've written has to be cut.
When Sue Roe decided to write a group biography about the French Impressionists, she little realised what a challenge it would be, involving her in hundreds of hours of research and cross-checking of information about her ten famous subjects; she was inspired to visit the places where they lived and worked.
I was writing my first novel, a convoluted, pretentious and, as it turned out, unpublishable thriller. "How do you feel about it?" he asked.
In an increasingly homogenised and uniform world rare and distinctive voices are especially needful. Sometimes those voices may be complex, difficult, troubling, but who wants to read a bland book?
Between my laptop and a thriving aloe vera plant is my hand-drawn map of the world of my current novel; I have to control that space before I can know how the story will unfold there.
Roy Bainton recalls some highlights of his long career as a writer for the popular music press, reviewing and writing tour brochures for a wide range of famous, and not-so-famous, artists.