Jonny Wright & Kerry Young

Jonny Wright considers the sobering parallels between the 1959 play A Raisin In The Sun, featuring a black family in Southside Chicago, and the racial inequality, downward economic mobility and defacto housing segregation of contemporary London.

Kerry Young describes her journey from failing 'O'-level English to becoming a successful novelist, and how her writing is a gift both to her late father and to the diverse cultures that have produced contemporary Jamaica.

Episode: 143
Date: 09-11-2017
Length: 26:38
Jonny Wright & Kerry Young
Image credit: Friedman Ables - scene from 1959 production of 'A Raisin In The Sun'
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